The Fourth Committee (Special Political and Decolonization) today approved five draft resolutions, including three by recorded vote, and one draft decision concerning decolonization and related agenda items, as it concluded its general debate on decolonization.
It first approved the draft resolution titled “Information from Non-Self-Governing Territories transmitted under Article 73 e of the Charter of the United Nations” (document A/77/23, Chapter XIII) by a vote of 147 in favour to 2 against (United States, Israel), with 3 abstentions (France, Niger, United Kingdom).  By its terms, the General Assembly would reaffirm that the concerned administering Powers should continue to transmit information to the Organization with respect to their respective Territories.  It also requests those administering Powers to respect their obligations under Article 73 e of the Charter with regard to each Territory on the agenda of the Special Committee on Decolonization.
It also approved a draft resolution titled “Economic and other activities which affect the interests of the peoples of the Non-Self-Governing Territories” (document A/77/23, Chapter XIII) by a recorded vote of 152 in favour to 2 against (United States, Israel), with 3 abstentions (France, Myanmar, United Kingdom).  That text would see the Assembly reaffirm the right of the peoples of the Non-Self-Governing Territories to the enjoyment of their natural resources and their right to dispose of those resources in their best interests.  It would also urge the administering Powers concerned to take effective measures to safeguard those rights.  Further, it would call upon the administering Powers concerned to provide all the necessary assistance to the peoples of the Non-Self-Governing Territories affected by hurricanes, natural phenomena or other extreme weather events.
Next, it approved the draft resolution titled “Implementation of the Declaration on the Granting of Independence to Colonial Countries and Peoples by the specialized agencies and the international institutions associated with the United Nations” (document A/77/23, Chapter XIII) by a recorded vote of 11 in favour to 2 against (United States, Israel), with 43 abstentions.  That text would have the Assembly recommend that all States intensify their efforts through the specialized agencies and other organizations of the United Nations system of which they are members to ensure the full and effective implementation of the Declaration on the Granting of Independence to Colonial Countries and Peoples.
Acting without a vote, the Committee approved the draft resolution titled “Offers by Member States of study and training facilities for inhabitants of Non-Self-Governing Territories” (document A/C.4/77/L.2).  By the terms of that text, the Assembly would urge the administering Powers to take effective measures to ensure the widespread and continuous dissemination in the Territories under their administration of information relating to offers of study and training facilities made by States and to provide all the facilities necessary to enable students to avail themselves of such offers.
Turning to the agenda item “Implementation of the Declaration on the Granting of Independence to Colonial Countries and Peoples”, the Committee approved, without a vote, the draft decision titled “Question of Gibraltar” (document A/C.4/77/L.3) and the draft resolution “Question of Western Sahara” (document A/C.4/77/L.4).
Prior to action on the draft resolutions, the Committee resumed and concluded its general debate on decolonization and related agenda items, with the question of Western Sahara once again figuring prominently.
Algeria’s representative said that Morocco’s autonomy proposal sets a dangerous precedent because it legitimizes the occupation of Western Sahara and the plunder of the resources of the Sahrawi people.  He called for a free and fair referendum to resolve the question, adding that his country will continue to discharge its responsibilities towards the Sahrawi refugees.
Morocco’s representative said that more than 98 Member States support the Moroccan autonomy initiative as the only solution to the dispute.  He stated that the Moroccan Sahara is a geopolitical matter and that the question of the Sahara would not exist if Algeria were a peaceful neighbour and respected United Nations principles.  “There was never a Western Sahara […] and there will never be anything but a Moroccan Sahara,” he said.
Burkina Faso’s representative welcomed the Moroccan autonomy initiative, calling it a realistic alternative that is in accordance with international law and the United Nations Charter.  Reaching a political solution to this dispute will contribute to the stability of the Sahel region, he added.
New Zealand’s representative noted the assistance that his country, as the administering Power, provided to Tokelau during the COVID-19 pandemic and the ways it is helping to improve public services.  “In sum, the challenges posed by COVID‑19 have only strengthened Aotearoa New Zealand’s resolve to support Tokelau in its efforts to strengthen its capacity for self-governance and self-determination,” he said.
The United States representative, in the same vein, emphasized that American Samoa, Guam and the United States Virgin Islands were included in his country’s national COVID-19 pandemic relief and recovery programmes.  Each of the Territories are locally self-governing, with democratic political institutions and strong private-sector-led economies, he said, adding that they also enjoy representation at the federal level.
Ghana’s representative said that the Committee must shift from being a mere spectator to an active guarantor of the human and economic rights of the peoples of the Non-Self-Governing Territories.  “We can no longer continue to repeat the process of reaffirming our support for the mandate of the Committee without seeking accountability or showing practical steps for its implementation.”
Also speaking today were representatives of Sierra Leone, China, Gabon, United Kingdom, Botswana, Serbia, Liberia, Equatorial Guinea, Papua New Guinea, Costa Rica, Cabo Verde, Djibouti and Burundi.
Speaking in explanation of positions with respect to the draft resolutions were representatives of the United Kingdom, United States, Argentina and the Czech Republic.
Representatives of the United Kingdom, Spain, Iran, United Arab Emirates and Argentina spoke in exercise of the right of reply.
The Fourth Committee will reconvene at 3 p.m. on Monday, 17 October, to commence its work on the effects of atomic radiation and to take action on the remaining decolonization agenda items.
Decolonization
MAMADI GOBEH KAMARA (Sierra Leone) said that the situation of each of the Non-Self-Governing Territories should be handled on a case-by-case-basis, in line with relevant resolutions and with the close collaboration of the administering Powers.  “We need to encourage them [the administering Powers] to continue to cater for the health, economic, education and other development needs in their respective territories.”  On the question of Western Sahara, she reiterated Sri Lanka’s unwavering support for the ongoing political process, welcomed the efforts of Staffan De Mistura, the Special Envoy of the Secretary-General for Western Sahara, and voiced support for the Moroccan autonomy initiative.  She commended Morocco’s implementation of a new development model in Moroccan Sahara and noted the opening of consulates in Laayoune and Dakhla by several States.
DAVID FAIRWEATHER (New Zealand) described the assistance that his country provided to Tokelau in response to the COVID‑19 pandemic, noting that the Territory remains free of the coronavirus and that most of its eligible population is fully vaccinated.  Border measures and ongoing vaccinations are likely to remain a part of life for Tokelau for the foreseeable future.  Emphasizing the unique relationship between New Zealand and Tokelau, he drew attention to the decision by Tokelau’s General Fono in May 2022 to begin a new conversation on self-determination in the lead-up to the centenary of New Zealand’s administration in 2026.  He reviewed the ways in which his country is working with Tokelau to improve public services, including an international submarine cable with inter-atoll connections, sustainable fisheries management and modernization of the Territory’s laws to ensure that they reflect international norms.  “In sum, the challenges posed by COVID‑19 have only strengthened Aotearoa New Zealand’s resolve to support Tokelau in its efforts to strengthen its capacity for self-governance and self-determination,” he said.
The representative of China, associating herself with the Group of Friends in Defense of the Charter of the United Nations, said that colonialist ideology is still running rampant in the form of hegemony, racism and xenophobia, among other things.  The international community must come together to eliminate colonialism’s pernicious legacy and safeguard international equity and justice.  She called on the administering Powers to take effective measures to promote development, safeguard human rights and protect the environment in the Non-Self-Governing Territories.  She also urged those countries which once either pursued or benefited from the colonial system to show political will, compensate for the negative consequences of colonialism and help former colonies in achieving socioeconomic development.  Voicing support for Argentina’s sovereign claim over the Malvinas* Islands, South Georgia and South Sandwich Islands and the surrounding maritime areas, she said that China always stands for the settlement of inter-State territorial disputes through peace talks.
The representative of Ghana said that the Committee must shift from being a mere spectator to an active guarantor of the human and economic rights of the peoples of the Non-Self-Governing Territories.  “We can no longer continue to repeat the process of reaffirming our support for the mandate of the Committee without seeking accountability or showing practical steps for its implementation.”  She added that the Committee must help to enhance the various negotiation processes toward self-determination and encourage the enhancement of relations between the Territories and their administering Powers for a speedy determination of those Territories’ statuses.  She called on the administering Powers and the Non-Self-Governing Territories to continue to cooperate with the Special Committee, including by facilitating visiting missions and by timely reporting on the implementation of the Declaration on the Granting of Independence to Colonial Countries and Peoples.
The representative of Gabon, noting that the decolonization agenda of the United Nations is unfinished, called on the Organization to adapt its strategies to current challenges.  Reaffirming support for the current political process under way in the Moroccan Sahara under the auspices of the Secretary-General, he commended the efforts of the Personal Envoy, adding that the resumption of diplomacy is an encouraging sign.  Urging all parties to engage in this process in a spirit of compromise, he added that the Moroccan autonomy initiative offers credible and reassuring prospects for a mutually acceptable solution.  He also praised the new model of economic development being implemented in the southern provinces, saying that it will help strengthen regional socioeconomic progress.
The representative of the United Kingdom said his country has a modern relationship with all its overseas Territories, based on partnership, shared values and the right of the people of each Territory to choose to remain British.  The territories have a large measure of internal self-Government, he said, expressing his country’s commitment to supporting them on matters such as environmental protection and security.  Reaffirming the United Kingdom’s longstanding commitment to the people of Gibraltar, he said it will not enter into arrangements under which they would pass under the sovereignty of another State against their wishes.  Following its departure from the European Union, the United Kingdom, along with the Governments of Gibraltar and Spain, agreed to a political framework on how a future agreement between the United Kingdom and the European Union would function in the interests of all parties, he said.  Further, the Government of the United Kingdom has no doubt about its sovereignty over the Falkland Islands (Malvinas), South Georgia and South Sandwich Islands and the surrounding maritime areas, he said, reaffirming the Falkland Islanders’ right of self-determination.  In the 2013 referendum, 99.8 per cent of those who voted wanted to maintain their current status as a territory of the United Kingdom, he added.
COLLEN V. KELAPILE (Botswana) said that during this decade, the administering Powers are expected to step up their commitment to promoting the political, economic, social, cultural and educational advancement of colonized peoples and to facilitate their exercise of the right of self-determination.  He expressed concern that the path to decolonization and a referendum in Western Sahara has been obstructed for 30 years, adding that military aggression, human rights violations and the undermining of a raft of relevant United Nations resolutions and international law have delayed progress and led to the collapse of the 1991 ceasefire in November 2020.  He urged parties to recommit to a political process to grant the people of Western Sahara the opportunity to exercise their right to self-determination and independence.  He also encouraged the Special Committee on Decolonization to undertake a visiting mission to Western Sahara, saying that the last one was conducted in 1975 and a new one is long overdue.
BORIS HOLOVKA (Serbia), noting that decolonization continues to be a very important aspect of the work of the United Nations, reiterated his country’s full respect for the principles of territorial integrity and sovereignty of States.  Referring to the question of the Falkland Islands (Malvinas), he underscored that all outstanding disputes should be resolved peacefully and through dialogue, in line with international law and with full respect for the principles of sovereignty and territorial integrity of all States.  He called on the two sides to continue negotiations to achieve a peaceful, just and lasting solution to the issue at hand.
The representative of Liberia welcomed the efforts to relaunch the political process in Western Sahara, saying that only a political solution along with the enhanced cooperation of the Arab Maghreb Union can contribute to stability and security in the Sahel region.  She called for a resumption of the round-table process as foreseen by Security Council resolution 2602 (2021).  She further expressed her support for the Moroccan autonomy initiative, noting that it is supported by more than 90 countries and that it will lead to rapid social and economic development in the region.  She welcomed the inauguration of consulates in Laayoune and Dakhla, commended Morocco’s respect for the ceasefire, recognized that country’s cooperation with the United Nations Mission for the Referendum in Western Sahara (MINURSO) and encouraged all the parties to the conflict to remain committed and engage constructively for a realistic and sustainable political solution.
JEFFREY DELAURENTIS (United States) said his country recognizes the challenges faced by American Samoa, Guam and the United States Virgin Islands due to their size, isolated locations and limited natural resources.  The Government of the United States maintains close partnerships with the local Governments in those Territories, whose people are an integral part of American society.  That strong relationship was evidenced by the Territories’ inclusion in the United States’ national COVID‑19 pandemic relief and recovery programmes.  The United States recognizes its obligations under the Charter of the United Nations to promote self-determination for the peoples of American Samoa, Guam, and the United States Virgin Islands, he continued. While each has the status of Non-Self-Governing Territory, those Territories are locally self-governing, with democratic political institutions and strong private sector-led economies.  They also enjoy political representation at the federal level.  Going forward, the United States will continue to support the Territories in their efforts to improve the quality of life of their peoples, he said.
ANATOLIO NDONG MBA (Equatorial Guinea) called on colonizing Powers to comply with relevant General Assembly and Security Council resolutions and to accelerate still-outstanding decolonization processes.  On the question of Moroccan Sahara, he called for talks to resume with the participation of all parties, including Morocco, Algeria, Mauritania and the Frente Popular para la Liberación de Saguia el-Hamra y de Río de Oro (Frente POLISARIO) to end this long-standing regional dispute.  He welcomed the autonomy initiative promoted by Morocco, saying that it is welcomed by many countries and lays a path for peaceful coexistence between the parties.  Morocco’s investment and projects for Moroccan Sahara have contributed to the development and empowerment of the population, he said, adding that his country established a consulate in Dakhla in October 2020.
The representative of Papua New Guinea, noting the richness of the discussions in the past few days, called for inclusive dialogue at all levels.  Morocco’s noteworthy autonomy initiative, along with the relevant Council and Assembly resolutions, provides a sound basis to build on, he said, encouraging all key stakeholders to resume round-table talks and seize the positive momentum generated so far in order to find a lasting political solution.  He also commended Morocco for strengthening sustainable development in the Sahara region.  He stressed the importance of addressing human rights violations in the Tindouf camps, adding that the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) must be permitted to register the populations of those camps and provide support as necessary.
The representative of Burkina Faso, reiterating solidarity with the people of Non-Self-Governing Territories, said that the United Nations must step up efforts to enable the people of those Territories to enjoy the right to self-determination.  Peaceful and just solutions can be found for the 17 Non-Self-Governing Territories that are aspiring for independence, he said.  On the question of Western Sahara, he reaffirmed support for the political process being carried out under the auspices of the Secretary-General.  He welcomed the Moroccan autonomy initiative, calling it a realistic alternative that is in accordance with international law and the United Nations Charter.  Reaching a political solution to this dispute will contribute to the stability of the Sahel region, he added.
The representative of Costa Rica drew attention to the grave impact of the Western Sahara conflict on women and girls and reiterated a call for coherency, underlining a “moral debt” based on racial discrimination, gender oppression and environmental inequality.  Costa Rica recognizes Argentina’s legitimate right of sovereignty over the Maldives and related islands and the surrounding maritime areas, she added.  She emphasized that the principle of free determination is not an absolute right, being limited by the principle of territorial integrity, and that it cannot therefore be applied to the Malvinas in the absence of an active subject that is a bearer of that right.  
The representative of Cabo Verde reiterated firm support for ongoing negotiations on the question of Western Sahara and supported the renewal of MINURSO’s mandate.  He encouraged the resumption of the round-table process, emphasizing that differences must be overcome through negotiations.  He further welcomed Morocco’s autonomy initiative.  “We need a strong, united and prosperous Africa, and the timely solution of the Western Sahara dispute is for sure one of its success premises,” he added.
MOHAMED ABDOULKADER KAMIL (Djibouti) said that United Nations peacekeeping operations must have well-trained and properly equipped personnel as well as improved capabilities to operate in high-risk areas.  Voicing concern about the increase in attacks against peacekeeping soldiers and disinformation campaigns targeting peacekeeping operations, he urged all stakeholders to take the necessary measures to improve peacekeepers’ safety and security.  He underscored the crucial role of women in peacekeeping, adding that multilingualism is important for the United Nations as it carries out its mandates around the world.
MOHAMED AL HASSAN (Oman), Committee Chair, said that the Committee takes note of the representative of Djibouti’s statement as it pertains to the agenda items under consideration.  He also recommended that that part of the statement that concerns other items not yet being discussed by the Committee be taken into consideration at that later stage.
ZÉPHYRIN MANIRATANGA (Burundi), on the question of Western Sahara, voiced support for the political process, adding that Burundi is also happy with the new impetus of the round-table process.  The stakeholders must remain engaged, he said, calling on all parties to strengthen cooperation with the countries of the Maghreb, thus contributing to stability and security in the Sahel.  This year’s visits by the Secretary-General’s Personal Envoy for Western Sahara will provide a new perspective on the political process and the round-table discussions.  A solution to the dispute can and must be found and will require dialogue based on relevant Security Council resolutions and Secretary-General’s reports, he stressed.
MOHAMED ENNADIR LARBAOUI (Algeria), recalling his country’s struggle for independence, pointed to the legal character of the question of Western Sahara.  Various Council and Assembly resolutions have reaffirmed the legitimate right of the Territory’s people to self-determination, he said, adding that Morocco’s autonomy proposal as a single option constitutes a dangerous precedent because it legitimizes the occupation and the continued plunder of the resources of the Sahrawi people.  The Moroccan position contains several baseless claims to hoodwink the international community, he said, adding that the insistence on the revival of the round tables as a precondition for negotiation is proof that this machinery is being used as a pretext to change the nature of the dispute from one of decolonization to a regional dispute.  He questioned why Morocco is afraid of holding the referendum in Western Sahara if the situation is as ideal as they pretend it to be, adding that the Tindouf refugee camps are the result of Moroccan occupation.  Calling for a free and fair referendum, he stressed that Algeria will continue to discharge its responsibilities towards the Sahrawi refugees.
OMAR HILALE (Morocco) highlighted the visit of the Secretary-General’s Personal Envoy to Rabat and the adoption of Council resolution 2602 (2021), saying that more than 98 Member States support the Moroccan autonomy initiative as the only solution to the dispute.  Highlighting the new development model for the southern provinces, he pointed to the building in Laayoune of the largest bridge in Africa and the pharmaceutical university, among others.  He said that people have been sequestered in the Tindouf camps for five decades under inhuman conditions.  They continue not to be registered due to Algeria’s opposition to a census.  The separatist armed group Frente POLISARIO forces the separation of children from their families for military indoctrination, he said, adding that all those responsible for that war crime must be brought to international justice.  Addressing the representative of Algeria’s assertion that his country is not a party to the dispute and is only defending the principle of self-determination, he said that Moroccan Sahara is a geopolitical matter and that Algeria devotes its diplomacy to the promotion and defense of an armed group with proven terrorist links.  Moreover, Algeria continues to block the efforts of the Secretary-General’s Personal Envoy to relaunch the round table.  The question of the Sahara would not exist if Algeria were a peaceful neighbor and respected United Nations principles.  “There was never a Western Sahara … and there will never be anything but a Moroccan Sahara,” he said.  He went on express Morocco’s support for the United Arab Emirates regarding the islands of Abu Musa, Greater Tunb and Lesser Tunb, noting that they are occupied by Iran.
Action on Draft Resolutions
The Committee then took action on several draft resolutions, including texts contained in the report of the Special Committee on the Situation with regard to the Implementation of the Declaration on the Granting of Independence to Colonial Countries and Peoples (Special Committee on Decolonization) (document A/77/23).
It first took up the draft resolution titled “Information from Non-Self-Governing Territories transmitted under Article 73 e of the Charter of the United Nations”, contained in Chapter XIII of the Special Committee’s report.
It approved the text by a recorded vote of 147 in favour to 2 against (United States, Israel), with 3 abstentions (France, Niger, United Kingdom).
The representative of the United Kingdom, explaining his delegation’s decision to abstain, said that while his country did not take issue with the main objective of the text, the decision as to whether a Non-Self-Governing Territory has reached the level of self-government sufficient to relieve the administering Power of the obligation to submit information under Article 73 e of the Charter is ultimately for its Government and the administering Power concerned to decide, and not the General Assembly.
The representative of Eritrea said that she was absent during the vote and that she would have voted in favour.
The representative of the United States, speaking in explanation of position on several draft resolutions, said that many of the texts continue to place too much weight on independence as a one-size-fits-all option.  Underscoring that the Territories can speak for themselves, and it is not for the Assembly to press for any particular outcome, he expressed concern that the draft resolution titled “Implementation of the Declaration on the Granting of Independence to Colonial Countries and Peoples by the specialized agencies and the international institutions associated with the United Nations” contains an outdated call to terminate all military activities in the Territories.  He underscored the sovereign right of his country’s Government to carry out military activities in accordance with its national security interests.
On “Information from Non-Self-Governing Territories transmitted under Article 73 e of the Charter of the United Nations”, he said that it is up to administering States to determine whether a Territory has achieved self-governance and whether to transmit information under that Article.  Regarding “The Question of Guam”, he said that the law establishing Guam’s planned plebiscite on self-determination violates his country’s Constitutional guarantees against race-based discrimination in the exercise of voting rights.
The Committee then took up the draft resolution titled “Economic and other activities which affect the interests of the peoples of the Non-Self-Governing Territories”, contained in Chapter XIII of the Special Committee’s report.
It approved the text by a recorded vote of 152 in favour to 2 against (United States, Israel), with 3 abstentions (France, Myanmar, United Kingdom).
The representative of Argentina, speaking in explanation of position, said that the right to self-determination requires for its exercise an active subject, namely, a people subject to subjugation, domination and foreign exploitation.  If such a subject does not exist, then the principle of self-determination does not apply.  That is the case of the Malvinas, South Georgia and South Sandwich Islands and the surrounding maritime areas, which are illegally occupied by the United Kingdom, which expelled the population and replaced it with British nationals, he said.
Next, the Committee took up the draft resolution titled “Implementation of the Declaration on the Granting of Independence to Colonial Countries and Peoples by the specialized agencies and the international institutions associated with the United Nations”, contained in Chapter XIII of the Special Committee’s report.
The Committee approved the text by a recorded vote of 11 in favour to 2 against (United States, Israel), with 43 abstentions.
The representative of the United Kingdom, speaking in explanation of position, voiced support for the specialized agencies in their efforts to offer assistance in Non-Self-Governing Territories in the humanitarian, technical and education fields.  However, as the status of those agencies must be carefully respected, his delegation abstained from the vote.
The representative of Argentina said that text must be applied in accordance with relevant resolutions and decisions of the Assembly and the Special Committee on Decolonization with regard to specific Territories.
Turning to the draft resolution on “Offers by Member States of study and training facilities for inhabitants of Non-Self-Governing Territories” (document A/C.4/77/L.2), the Committee approved the text without a vote.
Next, the Committee took up the draft decision entitled “Question of Gibraltar” (document A/C.4/77/L.3) and the draft resolution on “Question of Western Sahara” (document A/C.4/77/L.4*).
The representative of Czech Republic, speaking in explanation of position on behalf of the European Union, said that he looked forward to the approval by consensus of the text concerning the question of Western Sahara.  He noted a new dynamic and a new spirit leading to the resumption of the political process aimed at reaching a just and lasting solution.  Encouraging the parties to work towards a solution within the framework of the United Nations, he expressed support for the Special Envoy’s efforts and stressed the importance of the meaningful participation of women and youth in the political process.  UNHCR must maintain its consideration of refugee registration in the Tindouf camps, he said, expressing concern about the implications of the Western Sahara conflict on regional security.
The Committee then adopted both texts without a vote.
Right of Reply
The representative of Argentina, speaking in exercise of the right of reply, reiterated his country’s position on the Malvinas Islands, noting that they are illegally occupied and the subject of a sovereignty dispute between Argentina and the United Kingdom.  The principle of the free determination of peoples, on which the United Kingdom bases its refusal to resume negotiations, does not apply in this dispute, he said.
The representative of the United Kingdom said that his country has no doubt about its sovereignty over the Falkland Islands (Malvinas) and that it is not militarizing that Territory.  He also said that his country has no doubt about its sovereignty over Gibraltar and the territorial waters surrounding it.
The representative of Spain said that Gibraltar is a colony established on Spanish territory that violates the country’s territorial integrity.  Negotiations between the European Union and the United Kingdom regarding Gibraltar should lead to an agreement that would be beneficial to all and respectful to Spain’s legal position, he said.
The representative of Iran asserted his country’s sovereignty over the Iranian islands of Abu Musa, Greater Tunb and Lesser Tunb in the Persian Gulf and objected to the misuse of the Committee to raise issues that do not fall within its purview.  Morocco’s unfounded claim constitutes a flagrant interference in his country’s domestic affairs, he added.
The representative of the United Arab Emirates reaffirmed that the Greater Tunb, Lesser Tunb and Abu Musa in the Arab Gulf are an integral part of his country’s territory.  He rejected their ongoing occupation by Iran and called on that country to comply with the principles of international law and the United Nations Charter to arrive at a peaceful settlement of that issue.
The representative of Argentina said that a decision to resume negotiations on the Malvinas does not depend on the desire of the people implanted on the islands by the administering Power.  Rather, it is enshrined in the United Nations Charter and relevant resolutions. 
The delegate of Iran said that his country’s decisions regarding the three islands in the Persian Gulf have always been made on the basis of Iran’s sovereignty and territorial integrity.  He added that Persian Gulf is the correct name for the body of water between the Arabian Peninsula and the Iranian Plateau.
* A dispute exists between the Governments of Argentina and the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland concerning sovereignty over the Falkland Islands (Malvinas).

In the Democratic Republic of the Congo, United Nations peacekeepers and the Congolese armed forces are regularly patrolling along national route 72 in Ituri’s Djugu territory. Reassured by the presence of national security forces and the United Nations, some displaced persons are also returning to their communities.
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