Abundant sunshine. High 78F. Winds light and variable..
Clear to partly cloudy. Low 47F. Winds light and variable.
Updated: October 23, 2022 @ 11:48 am
At the William H. Johnson Painting Workshops on Oct. 22 and 29 at the Albany Museum of Art, Albany State University Associate Art Professor Michael Mallard will instruct participants on Johnson’s use of color, shape, and symbolism in his “Fighters for Freedom: William H. Johnson Picturing Justice” series, which includes this painting: Marian Anderson, ca. 1945, oil on paperboard, Smithsonian American Art Museum, gift of the Harmon Foundation.
At the William H. Johnson Painting Workshops on Oct. 22 and 29 at the Albany Museum of Art, Albany State University Associate Art Professor Michael Mallard will instruct participants on Johnson’s use of color, shape, and symbolism in his “Fighters for Freedom: William H. Johnson Picturing Justice” series, which includes this painting: Marian Anderson, ca. 1945, oil on paperboard, Smithsonian American Art Museum, gift of the Harmon Foundation.
ALBANY — Two Saturday-morning painting workshops at the Albany Museum of Art will give participants the opportunity to explore the shapes, colors, and symbolism employed by renowned American artist William H. Johnson, whose works are currently on view in the AMA Haley Gallery.
The workshops are 10 a.m.-noon on Oct. 22 and 29 in the AMA classroom. They will be taught by Michael Mallard, associate professor of visual art in the College of Arts and Sciences at Albany State University. A professional artist, Mallard was artist-in-residence at the Albany Museum of Art in 2021.
“Participants will be given the opportunity to react to William H. Johnson’s work in a hands-on and creative way, discovering the artist’s use of shape, color, and symbolism,” Annie Vanoteghem, director of education and public programming for the AMA, said. “Participants can attend one or both of the workshops.”
An exhibition of Johnson’s work, “Fighters for Freedom: William H. Johnson Picturing Justice,” continues through Dec. 10, at the AMA. The exhibition is organized by the Smithsonian American Art Museum, with support provided by Art Bridges.
“The paintings in ‘Fighters for Freedom’ were created by Johnson circa 1945,” Vanoteghem said. “He and his wife returned to the United States from Europe just before World War II started. In the series, which he only exhibited twice, he used colors, elongated figures, and symbols to recognize heroes who fought for social justice and world peace. His style for these paintings was quite different from the Impressionist and Expressionist style works he created in Europe.”
Johnson (1901-1970) was born in Florence, S.C., but left the Jim Crow South for New York at age 17 to pursue his dream of becoming an artist. He enrolled in the National Academy of Design and worked with painter Charles Hawthorne, who raised funds to send Johnson abroad to study and paint. After college, he spent a decade traveling Europe, where he became known as an up-and-coming modernist for his Expressionist landscapes. During his time in Europe, his career included a gamut of styles, including Impressionism, Cubism, Fauvism, and German Expressionism.
Johnson met and married Danish artist Holcha Krake. They traveled to North Africa and lived in Denmark and the Lofoten Islands in Norway before moving to New York in 1938 as the threat of World War II loomed.
After returning to the United States, Johnson departed from his brilliant landscapes as he shifted his focus to African American life. He began a style of “conscious naiveté” in which he used simplified forms, symbolism, and flat planes of vivid color.
“Each painting in ‘Fighters for Freedom’ tells a complete story,” Vanoteghem noted. “For instance, in his painting of opera singer Marian Anderson, who became a civil rights icon when she sang for 75,000 people at the Lincoln Memorial in 1939 after she was denied the opportunity to sing at Constitution Hall, Johnson surrounds Anderson with flags and monuments that show how popular she was in Europe and South America.”
Johnson’s final years were tragic as his mental and physical health increasingly suffered after his wife died in 1944. His final exhibition during his lifetime was in 1947, and he spent his final 23 years in a Long Island, N.Y., hospital.
His entire body of work was almost lost when his caretaker could no longer pay storage fees. Friends of Johnson rescued the artworks, and donated them to the Harmon Foundation, which in 1967 donated them to the Smithsonian American Art Museum.
“While Johnson very tragically died in relative obscurity and was unable to paint over the last two decades of his life, he is now recognized as one of the most important African-American artists of his generation,” Vanoteghem said. “These workshops will be an ideal way for participants to study the work of this important American artist.”
The cost of each workshop is $15 for AMA members or $20 for non-members. A secure link for online registration may be found at www.albanymuseum.com/whj-painting-workshops.
The Albany Museum of Art is located at 311 Meadowlark Drive, adjacent to Albany State University’s West Campus just off Gillionville Road. The museum is accredited by the American Alliance of Museums and is open to the public 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays. Admission is free.
{{description}}
Email notifications are only sent once a day, and only if there are new matching items.
Success! An email has been sent to with a link to confirm list signup.
Error! There was an error processing your request.
Sign up for Albany Eats, a weekly email newsletter with the latest on eateries in the Albany area sprinkled with recipes.
Success! An email has been sent to with a link to confirm list signup.
Error! There was an error processing your request.
Get the latest obituaries delivered to your inbox every weekday morning.
PAINTING AND HOME REPAIR Tile work, popcorn ceiling remov…
We Remodel Bathrooms Call James Cox 229-883-5385
SUN & RAIN HANDYMAN Drywall Finishing & Repairs, …
Enter the October Free Gas Giveaway from Homerun Foods for a chance to win.

Newsroom
Sports
Phone: 229-888-9300

306 West Broad Ave.
Albany, GA 31701
Get up-to-the-minute news sent straight to your device.
Sorry, an error occurred.

Sign up for Albany Eats, a weekly email newsletter with the latest on eateries in the Albany area sprinkled with recipes.
Get the daily Albany Herald e-edition delivered to your inbox every morning.
Get the latest business news delivered to your inbox every weekday morning.
Get contests, advertising specials, special deals and more sent to your email address. 
Get the the most recent coronavirus news delivered to your inbox daily.
Keep up with local events in southwest Georgia.
Every Monday, find a list of upcoming events in your email inbox.
On Fridays, upcoming weekend events are delivered to your email inbox.
Get the Local News headlines from the Albany Herald delivered daily to your email inbox.
Get the most popular posts on AlbanyHerald.com from the previous week emailed to you every Monday morning.
Get the latest obituaries delivered to your inbox every weekday morning.
Get our expert short-term forecast, summary of the weather details and news of any severe weather in the Albany, Georgia area.
Get the Sports headlines from the Albany Herald delivered daily to your email.
Get a list of upcoming high school sports events delivered to your email inbox every Thursday.

Thank you .
Your account has been registered, and you are now logged in.
Check your email for details.
Invalid password or account does not exist
Submitting this form below will send a message to your email with a link to change your password.
An email message containing instructions on how to reset your password has been sent to the e-mail address listed on your account.

Secure & Encrypted
Secure transaction. Cancel anytime.

Thank you.
Your purchase was successful, and you are now logged in.
A receipt was sent to your email.

source

Shop Sephari