In recent years, definitions of work culture — "how we do things around here" — have changed tremendously. Many aspects (e.g., processes, technology, workflows, training) are morphing as leaders adapt to global pressures and new employee expectations.
Some shifts are obvious, such as dramatic changes in where employees work. However, most culture change is subtle, slow and difficult to define. For example, culture change might manifest as:
Culture drift may seem inconsequential. But when your culture shifts, so do the messages you convey to employees and job candidates about what matters most to your organization. Even gradual evolution can lead to significant changes in your employee, customer and shareholder experiences. In the end, minor culture drift can influence global stakeholders' confidence in how well your organization keeps its promises.
Even gradual evolution can lead to significant changes in your employee, customer and shareholder experiences. In the end, minor culture drift can influence global stakeholders' confidence in how well your organization keeps its promises.
Taking charge of culture drift is essential to your organization's long-term success — a great culture attracts world-class talent and focuses and engages employees. When employees are on the same page as leaders, they can meet behavioral expectations and deliver customer experiences that set your organization apart from the competition.
Ask yourself: How much alignment do you want among employees and managers? Is your culture on par with talent-magnet workplaces? Or succumbing to drift? If you want exceptional alignment — where employees not only understand your vision, but also align their behavior with that vision — you must make culture a long-term priority.
It's no surprise, then, that culture is a top concern among CHROs Gallup surveyed in 2021.
The question isn't if your culture has drifted, but where and how. It's up to leaders to determine which shifts are beneficial and which are detrimental.
To avoid flying blind, leaders need to address several questions:
Gallup has been studying culture transformation for decades. Our analytics and advice have helped leaders globally measure their culture, define their ideal state and achieve their culture goals.
The question isn't if your culture has drifted, but where and how. It's up to leaders to determine which shifts are beneficial and which are detrimental.
As culture experts at Gallup, we've learned three lessons that can help leaders take charge of culture drift and intentionally direct their culture's future:
Remember: Culture change happens gradually — leaders must be committed to investing in their culture as a long-term priority. Communicate often and consistently about your vision for the culture. Ask yourself: What example do you set as a leader? The most influential, tone-setting messages for culture come from executives, so be sure that everything you say and do aligns with your aspired culture.
Culture drift can be positive: It's part of being an agile organization. What's vital is that leaders keep their finger on the pulse of their culture to ensure their culture evolves in a direction that supports what matters most to their organization.
Perhaps most importantly, leaders need to go beyond talking about culture. It takes intentionality and long-term dedication to build a resilient culture that inspires people globally. No organization is immune to disruption and the consequential culture drift — and only leaders can control it.
Rohit Kar is a Managing Consultant at Gallup.
Allan Watkinson is a Managing Consultant at Gallup.
Bailey Nelson is a Writer at Gallup.
Get the insights you need to create an exceptional workplace.
Subscribe to the Gallup at Work newsletter to get our latest articles, analytics and advice.
Fields marked with an asterisk (*) are required
Unify the mini-cultures that spring up in a growing organization.
Learn what organizational culture is, why it’s so important and the impact it can have on your company’s performance.
Trust empowers collaboration, agility and hope — but trust is in a bear market. See what leaders can do to turn it around.
Most leaders understand the importance of having an inclusive workplace. But how do you actually build one?

Gallup https://www.gallup.com/workplace/397034/steer-drifting-culture.aspx
Gallup World Headquarters, 901 F Street, Washington, D.C., 20001, U.S.A
+1 202.715.3030

source

Shop Sephari