Some clouds and possibly an isolated thunderstorm late. Low near 70F. Winds light and variable. Chance of rain 30%..
Some clouds and possibly an isolated thunderstorm late. Low near 70F. Winds light and variable. Chance of rain 30%.
Updated: August 22, 2022 @ 8:13 pm
David Davenport with two paintings of Williamston’s Sunnyside Oyster Bar.
“Summer Fields” on an oil canvas.
One of David Davenport’s paintings of Sunnyside Oyster Bar in Williamston.
David Davenport’s “Afternoon Reflection.”

David Davenport with two paintings of Williamston’s Sunnyside Oyster Bar.
“Summer Fields” on an oil canvas.
One of David Davenport’s paintings of Sunnyside Oyster Bar in Williamston.
David Davenport’s “Afternoon Reflection.”
Durham artist and Martin County native David Davenport grew up in parallel-yet-separate worlds, eight miles apart.
He resided and attended school in the then-bustling town of Williamston. But on weekends, he would visit his grandparents and enter a whole different life in the farming community of Bear Grass, a world which continues to inspire how and what he paints.
“I feel like I am a city boy who was just really lucky,” he said.
Davenport spent his adolescent and teen years (mid-1950s and -60s) between the two places.
“I got the best of both worlds. I experienced something out there that gets under your skin,” he added.
He remembers lying awake in the old farmhouse, just listening.
“There were more sounds at night [than in town],” he said.
He was smitten. Not just by the sounds, but with the light and lines of the countryside.
Some of his paintings, inspired by his eastern North Carolina roots, are on display until Saturday, June 25 at The Edge Wilson art museum in downtown Wilson – part of a solo show titled Down East Light. The last day of the show, from 1 – 5 p.m., Davenport will be at the museum for a Meet the Artist event.
Barb White, owner of The Edge Wilson, said, “His mesmerization with the special light unique to this area is palpable in his oil paintings.”
Area residents might recognize elements in his artwork which seem familiar, but they may not be able to pinpoint the exact location.
“David’s paintings explore the atmospheric beauty of the landscape’s barns, fields and abandoned buildings and emphasize the effects of light on these subjects,” according to a press release for the Down East Light show. “Some of the works are imagined and others are loose interpretations of the actual place enhanced by his memory and imagination. David often travels the back roads of ‘Down East’ to view, paint and absorb the changing light on the barns and fields.”
Whimsical snatches of light, along with straight lines from plowed fields and buildings, playfully reflect country scenes — such as light dancing on a barn wall.
His process combines both realism and abstraction, he said.
“In my realistic, representational work, I’m trying to present a painting where you decide what it means to you. I try to make it literal — using light, shadow, mood, color and time of day – then add a little bit of mystery to what or where the place is,” he added.
“David attempts to share an intimate sense of place, one that allows the viewer to infuse his or her memories and experiences,” the museum press release continued.
“My work is about your interpretation of my work,” he explains.
Davenport graduated from Williamston [now Riverside] High School in 1967. He attended Louisburg College for two years where he took his first art history class and was hooked. He then attended East Carolina University, later teaching there for three years.
He and his wife, Carolyn, eventually moved to Durham and raised a family. Now retired, for over 30 years, Davenport taught Advertising and Graphic Design at Alamance Community College, while painting on weekends.
Davenport remains fascinated with the area’s distinctive light. Although based in Durham, where he paints most of the time, he continues to maintain a small studio in an outbuilding on the grounds of the old homeplace near Harrison Road in Bear Grass.
His parents, T.F. Davenport and Mary K. Wynne, and grandparents, Kneezer and Annie Bell Harrison, are deceased. He and his wife still own and have renovated the old farmhouse.
An element Davenport does not include in his paintings is people. The only exception is a painting of a person inside of Williamston’s Sunnyside Oyster Bar.
Davenport said art has always been a part of the fabric of his life. He remembers taking art classes as a boy at the Old City Hall in Williamston. At that time, art was not offered in school.
“Mr. Winslow traveled around and would come once-a-week to Williamston,” he said.
That is where Davenport realized he had talent.
Interestingly, as a young boy, Davenport also had a newspaper route delivering The Enterprise to area residents via bicycle.
Davenport’s art will be on display and for sale at The Edge Wilson,127 Barnes St. W. in Wilson until Saturday, June 25. Museum hours are 12 – 6 p.m. Wed. – Fri.; 12 – 5 p.m. Saturday; and 1 – 5 p.m. Sunday.
A Meet the Artist event will be from 1 p.m. – 5 p.m. Saturday, June 25, closing out the show. Call the Edge at 252-360-0376 or visit www.theedgewilson.com for more information.
Deborah Griffin can be reached via email at dgriffin@ncweeklies.com.
Thadd White can be reached via email at twhite@apgenc.com.

Sorry, there are no recent results for popular images.
www.WilliamstonEnterpriseNC.com
106 W Main St
Williamston, NC 27892
Main Phone: 252-792-1181
Customer Care Phone: 252-329-9505
Sorry, an error occurred.

Sign up with

Thank you .
Your account has been registered, and you are now logged in.
Check your email for details.
Invalid password or account does not exist
Sign in with
Submitting this form below will send a message to your email with a link to change your password.
An email message containing instructions on how to reset your password has been sent to the e-mail address listed on your account.

Secure & Encrypted
Secure transaction. Cancel anytime.

Thank you.
Your purchase was successful, and you are now logged in.
A receipt was sent to your email.

source

Shop Sephari