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Updated: September 18, 2022 @ 2:24 am
Atlanta artist Amber Nicole uses vinyl records, floral arrangements, and crystals on blank canvases to create 3D visual art as an artistic representation of the beauty in black women and natural black hair.
Amber Nicole, 28, said she hopes to remind the world that Black hair continues to transform and make divine hair statements.
Nicole celebrated her debut exhibit, My Hair Speaks Volumes, July 16, where she tackled themes inspired by the patience it takes for Black women to take care of their hair and the juxtaposition represented within the message behind her work.

Atlanta artist Amber Nicole uses vinyl records, floral arrangements, and crystals on blank canvases to create 3D visual art as an artistic representation of the beauty in black women and natural black hair.
Nicole celebrated her debut exhibit, My Hair Speaks Volumes, July 16, where she tackled themes inspired by the patience it takes for Black women to take care of their hair and the juxtaposition represented within the message behind her work.
Atlanta artist Amber Nicole uses vinyl records, floral arrangements, and crystals on blank canvases to create 3D visual art as an artistic representation of the beauty in black women and natural black hair.
The 28-year-old artist works to target and challenge the use of mixed mediums to convey the complexity of art while holding on to the beauty and vintage of the items used, which have withstood the test of time, making them conceptually similar to the journey and care of Black hair.
Her passion for music emerges within her appreciation for natural hair journeys, the preservation of music in vinyl form, and a hope to remind the world that Black hair continues to transform and make divine hair statements.
“When I think about hair, I genuinely think of a bouquet of flowers and the arrangement process,” Nicole said. “You have to be delicate in your approach. Flowers are graceful; they move with ease and can really transform a room with an explosion of colors and styles. I see black hair in the same way. It stands out, it is graceful, beautiful, and has so many variations to it, so much that no two styles are exactly alike (the same as a bouquet).”
Amber Nicole, 28, said she hopes to remind the world that Black hair continues to transform and make divine hair statements.
Nicole celebrated her debut exhibit, My Hair Speaks Volumes, July 16, where she tackled themes inspired by the patience it takes for Black women to take care of their hair and the juxtaposition represented within the message behind her work. Nicole harnesses an artistic perspective that unveils a unique hair story displayed through each canvas curated.
“I want to enter into new art spaces where you wouldn’t expect to see black creatives, and I want to make noise while I do it too,” Nicole said. “That means telling stories that matter to the black community and changing the idea around what black hair means from the viewpoint of others.”
Like so many others, Nicole said she grew up despising her hair. As a kid attending predominately white elementary and middle schools, she was teased relentlessly about her hair. Some of those mean comments, she says, still stuck.
Once Nicole reached college, she ditched the relaxers and embarked on her natural hair journey. Nicole said she dove into the natural hair world — watching tutorials, testing out new products, trying new hairstyles. In September 2021, she transitioned from a loose natural to locs.
Despite Nicole’s confidence in herself and her hair, she and numerous others are no strangers to workplace discrimination. Before becoming an artist full time, Nicole said she worked in human resources and was often called in to handle “hair situations.”
“I remember one manager spoke with me over the phone and went on a full rant about the way her employee’s hairstyle was extremely ‘unprofessional’ and ‘disturbing everyone else in the office,’” Nicole said. “Little did she know, I am a black woman, and I wasn’t having it.”
According to a study by Michigan State, 80% of Black women felt they needed to switch their hairstyle to align with more conservative standards in order to fit in at work. The study also found that Black women face the highest instances of hair discrimination. To combat this, 13 states and 28 cities have passed the C.R.O.WN. Act — Creating a Respectful and Open World for Natural Hair — a law prohibiting race-based hair discrimination. On March 18, the U.S. House of Representatives passed the C.R.OW.N. Act, moving it to the Senate.
In Georgia, Clayton County, East Point, Gwinnett County, South Fulton and Stockbridge has passed their own laws prohibiting race-based hair discrimination.
“Hair discrimination is very real and apparent, especially when it comes hidden within the walls of corporate systems designed to oppress POC who are wearing their hair and expressing their culture,” Nicole said. “The C.R.O.W.N Act is a monumental first step, but shouldn’t be where it all stops. More conversations and action plans are needed to address the mindsets of those behind closed doors that make harmful statements along with policies that target POC in the workplace.”
Nicole also addressed young children struggling with their hair, advising them to remember they are more than their hair. Social media has put so much pressure on Black children to chase what’s socially acceptable appearance-wise, she said.
Her advice?
“Express how you are, who you are, and whatever you love in whatever way speaks to you.”
Nicole said she is new to the art community, but wants to continue “pushing the visibility of black artists in the modern art world.”
“I want black women, and also black men, to appreciate just how cool they are and how amazing our hair can be,” Nicole said. “I hope people who find their identity in music are able to appreciate the landmark musicians who paved a way for others in the music industry, especially for musicians of color. And overall, I just hope that people can find appreciation in visual arts that really focus on black beauty, creativity, and cultural love.”
For more information on Nicole or to purchase her work, visit www.ambernicole.studio.

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