Kylie Fair Anderson has to constantly check the accuracy of her work against the live reference.
Kylie Fair Anderson stands in front of her easel, ready to paint at Little North Beach at Deception Pass State Park May 19.
Kylie Fair Anderson grabs some more paint during a recent outdoor session.

Kylie Fair Anderson has to constantly check the accuracy of her work against the live reference.
Kylie Fair Anderson stands in front of her easel, ready to paint at Little North Beach at Deception Pass State Park May 19.
Kylie Fair Anderson grabs some more paint during a recent outdoor session.
 
Overlooking the iconic Pacific Northwest view of Deception Pass stands a painter, ready with brushes, acrylic and her phone, to begin a new piece of artwork.
And she has tapped into a way to show her work to a growing audience with a painting  series on Facebook, TikTok and Instagram.
Kylie Fair Anderson isn’t just a skilled plein air painter, an artist who makes their paintings outdoors in ever-shifting light and weather conditions; she’s also a rising star online due to her savvy social media skills.
Anderson brings her art to the masses with humor and catchy sound bites. 
The self-described goofball loves social media, which she says 
has helped her engage on a personal level with people who stop to take a look a her work.
It helps that Anderson is an extrovert.
“I love making people laugh and being able to show my personality while I show my artwork,” Anderson said. “I’m really good at being me. I’m able to be social and do what I love, which is a lot of fun for me.”
People are excited to talk to Anderson when she is out painting. Many stop to watch, and some brave ones will approach to speak to her. While she’s working, Anderson is completely zoned into making her art, but the interactions with the public feeds her joy of the experience. For Anderson, it isn’t just about making the painting. Part of the process is about capturing all that she is experiencing and everything that’s happening in that moment.
It would seem at first glance that Anderson is creating viral videos all day long with a little work thrown in for flavor, but she doesn’t spend much time making them. When Anderson is done painting for the day she will usually film a few videos.
Many of Anderson’s paintings can take multiple days. Light, weather and time of day play a huge factor in when she can work. Making sure the conditions are as similar as possible to when she first started the painting is key. As her paintings can take multiple days, Anderson usually walks away from each location with a plethora of videos for content.
While Anderson loves social media and entertaining her followers, she also views her work as a much-needed distraction from technology.
“When I’m in my element and I’m doing what I love… I almost forget that it’s there,” Anderson said of her phone. “I’m just so in the moment.”
Anderson found her love of plein air while painting the University of Washington’s iconic fountain. The painting is her largest to date and is a massive three-panel piece, commonly known among artists as a triptych. Each canvas measures 16×20 inches, the equivalent size of a wooden pallet.
“It was really amazing being out there and being able to be around what I’m painting when I’m trying to capture it and using all my senses,” Anderson said.
A number of Anderson’s social media posts have gone viral.
One post on TikTok received over 5 million views. In the clip, which can also be viewed on Facebook and Instagram, Anderson slowly removes acrylic build-up from her pallet. Many people don’t know that when acrylic dries, it is still relatively pliable. As the built-up acrylic is removed and revealed to the world, the resemblance to a giant mass of chewing gum is uncanny.
Anderson wants everyone to know that the acrylic build-up on her pallet takes months to form, a concern that many of her followers share.
Heated debate and dialogue from Anderson’s followers keep the comment section lively. One follower describes the removed paint as, “forbidden fruit roll-up.” Other followers asked for a video of the paint removal without any audio overlay, which led to another viral video with SMR qualities.
In the future, when Anderson has collected enough, she plans to make the acrylic roll-ups into art pieces or coasters.
While watching Anderson’s social media posts, the viewer doesn’t just see her artwork; they also get a look into who she is as a person. The videos show her dancing and showing off her sense of humor. The audience can revel in her triumphs and also despair when a painting is giving her difficulties.
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